Policies

The BC Chamber's grassroots policy-development process is second-to-none in British Columbia. Every year, our membership of businesses, Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade develops policies that reflect the on-the-ground needs of B.C. businesses. Through this process, our membership endorses approximately 40 new policies every year at our Annual General Meeting.

The breadth and diversity of our policies reflects our broad-based membership; during any given year, we have policy recommendations for the majority, if not all, of B.C.’s provincial government ministries.

BC Chamber's 2018-19 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual Tracker

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses  

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses               

                               

2018
Transportation & Infrastructure
Efficiently moving people and goods is essential for economic growth and for building healthy communities. The economy and employment of the North Shore, the Sea to Sky and Sunshine Coast communities are inextricably linked to that of Metro Vancouver. However, the current transportation infrastructure connecting the North Shore to the rest of Metro Vancouver is inadequate and is stifling the economic sustainability of the port, of industry, of tourism and the viability of business in the entire region.
2018
Trade & Technology, Regulation
As a recognized world leader in cannabis breeding and cultivation, cannabis legalization in Canada holds great potential for British Columbia, however regulations from Ottawa have created a vague and uncertain transition opportunity for BC’s small business cannabis industry participants. At the provincial level, the handling of distribution and retail will directly impact the viability of small business in the cannabis industry. At such time as product shortages are realized from federal licensed producers, BC cannabis retailers should be granted the right to source from their pre-existing supply chain, rather than face failure of their businesses. When craft producers are regulated, they should be allowed to sell direct to private cannabis retailers, avoiding value added costs from Federal Licensed Producers (LP) and Government distribution.  This will allow small business retailers a competitive advantage with fairer margins to compete against much larger Licensed Producer products through government distribution. There should be a formulating procedure and sharing of knowledge on best practices for distribution from craft producers and processors to private retailers.
2018
Local & Regional Government, Transportation & Infrastructure
In March of 2018, NDP Premier John Horgan promised[1] that restrictive ‘Project Labour Agreements’ (PLAs) will be applied to all future public infrastructure projects, ensuring that contractors who are signatory to the BC Building Trades Unions (BTU), and their members will have exclusive access to working on those projects.  Horgan claimed that this process will result in the ‘best bids’ and that this process will maximize the benefits local communities receive from these projects as well as the number of wom
2018
Local & Regional Government, Regulation
Since its inception in 2013, Family Day in BC has always been on the second Monday of February. In 2012, a two-week consultation process was held in order to determine if British Columbians preferred the holiday to fall on the second or third Monday in February.  
2018
Local & Regional Government, Regulation
The financing and delivery of services such as water, fire protection, street lighting and lake level control are important issues for rural residents and businesses in British Columbia. Across the province, improvement districts, a form of local government (Bish and Clemmens, 2009, p. 70 and Statistics Canada, 2011b) deliver these services to approximately half of the 609,363 people that live in rural areas by.
2018
Local & Regional Government, Transportation & Infrastructure, Regulation
The lack of diverse and affordable housing options in parts of British Columbia is having a significant impact on employers and employees. To ensure future economic sustainability, municipalities must “increase the supply and diversity of the housing stock through infill developments, more compact housing forms and increased density[1]” without delay.   [1] Metro Vancouver Regional Growth Strategy (2017), Page 46
2018
Finance & Taxation, Local & Regional Government
The success of businesses in BC is directly impacted by the policies of our municipal and provincial governments such as:
2018
Finance & Taxation, Local & Regional Government, Healthy Communities
The BC and federal governments announced numerous programs and included in their budgets the means to address affordable housing. A mix of incentives, investments, and tools have been suggested which aligned with the intent of previous BC Chamber policies. What is required, however, is to ensure that the programs not only align with each other, but also addresses a continuum of housing needs, particularly for the modest to middle income earners in challenging housing markets.
2018
Finance & Taxation, Local & Regional Government
Depending on the government of the day, minimum wages either stagnate in comparison to the cost of living, or are increased substantially, to the dismay of employers. Workers either fall behind economically; or business owners, particularly in-service industries, suddenly find themselves facing larger than anticipated payrolls. Indexing minimum wage increases to the Consumer Price Index provides stability and certainty for both worker and owner.
2018
Finance & Taxation, Local & Regional Government, Healthy Communities
There are currently 12 municipalities in BC policed by 11 independent municipal police departments. These municipalities pay 100 percent of their policing costs from local property taxes. These departments are governed by municipal police boards and fall under the Fire and Police Services Collective Bargaining Act.   The current provision in the Fire and Police Services Collective Bargaining Act for an arbitrated resolution provides a process to ensure police and firefighters have a way to settle collective bargaining without jeopardizing delivery of the services they provide. However, the guidelines provided under Section 4(6) of the Act have resulted in collective agreements that are consistently higher than the rest of the labour market in BC. This has resulted in a significantly increased tax burden to residential and business taxpayers in those jurisdictions.     

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