Policies

The BC Chamber's grassroots policy-development process is second-to-none in British Columbia. Every year, our membership of businesses, Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade develops policies that reflect the on-the-ground needs of B.C. businesses. Through this process, our membership endorses approximately 40 new policies every year at our Annual General Meeting.

The breadth and diversity of our policies reflects our broad-based membership; during any given year, we have policy recommendations for the majority, if not all, of B.C.’s provincial government ministries.

BC Chamber's 2016 - 2017 Policy and Positions Manual

Click here to view (PDF).

2015
Transportation & Infrastructure
While the Province has made significant investments in improvements to highways in the north over the past decade, further and rapid investment continues to be required in order to enhance the safety and efficiency of these critical components in a supply chain which is driving growth in the economy of British Columbia.
2015
Transportation & Infrastructure
In preparation for the upcoming construction of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) pipelines we need to re-examine the permit process in B.C. to ensure consistency across other provinces in the delivery of oversized goods and materials which will be required as LNG construction starts.  In addition to LNG activities, increases in the forest sector and mining sectors, combined with larger machines required to complete construction and harvesting activities are driving the need for permit reform.
2015
Regulation
Port Metro Vancouver (PMV) is not only the largest port in Canada, but the largest port by tonnage in North America, and is the principal ocean gateway to the Asia Pacific.  Although the Lower Mainland ports were amalgamated in 2008, if the Lower Fraser River port existed as a stand-alone port, it would still be a significant port for Canada.
2015
Regulation
Inter-provincial barriers in Canada prohibit growth and limit consumer choice in too many businesses and industries. A prime example of an industry still hampered by antiquated inter-provincial trade barriers is the wine, beer and spirits industry.
2015
Regulation
Many businesses in British Columbia’s resource sector must grapple with differences between the employment standards legislation of B.C. and Alberta. This places an undue burden on many small businesses, and may result in a competitive disadvantage to B.C. businesses relative to those based in Alberta.
2015
Healthy Communities
The Safe Streets Act was enacted in 2004 by the province of British Columbia.  Business in B.C., especially retailers, put much effort in attracting customers to enter their store to purchase their products.  Many of these pay parking stations and sidewalk patios are being put in locations with high economic activity.  It is vital that these areas are safe and welcoming to all potential customers.
2015
Healthy Communities
A healthy community includes a strong and vibrant business community.  In order to return a community to full function following a community disaster or crisis, it is critical that businesses be returned to operation as quickly as possible.
2015
Regulation
Well designed and efficiently enforced business regulation improves the functioning of the economy by providing certainty for the business community.  In addition they also achieve environmental and social policy goals without imposing significant compliance costs on firms or weakening the ability of businesses to adapt to changing economic conditions, technologies and consumer preferences.
2015
Productivity, Regulation
Destination BC and its network of regional and community-based organizations must continue to generate demand through competitive marketing. They can best achieve industry growth by operating in an environment of predictable and performance-based funding.
2015
Skilled Workforce, Productivity, Regulation
Through more productivity and innovation, B.C.’s Digital Media, Film and Animation industries are growing rapidly and continue to create jobs, business opportunities and economic growth for our province. These three industries often combine digital technologies to produce their work and each sector is experiencing similar impediments to expand with this growth, making this policy issue still relevant today and over the next years ahead.

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