Policies

The BC Chamber's grassroots policy-development process is second-to-none in British Columbia. Every year, our membership of businesses, Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade develops policies that reflect the on-the-ground needs of B.C. businesses. Through this process, our membership endorses approximately 40 new policies every year at our Annual General Meeting.

The breadth and diversity of our policies reflects our broad-based membership; during any given year, we have policy recommendations for the majority, if not all, of B.C.’s provincial government ministries.

BC Chamber's 2018-19 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual Tracker

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses  

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses               

                               

2018
Local & Regional Government, Transportation & Infrastructure, Trade & Technology
Inter-provincial barriers in Canada prohibit growth and limit consumer choice in too many businesses and industries. A prime example of an industry still hampered by antiquated inter-provincial trade barriers is the wine, beer and spirits industry. Recently, our federal government liberalized inter-provincial trade in liquor by allowing individuals to import wine, beer and spirits for personal consumption, and a few provinces (including British Columbia) have made their own regulations congruent with this federal exemption. Unfortunately, in most Canadian provinces inter-provincial trade in liquor remains restricted by a patchwork of regulations. British Columbia must encourage other provinces to modernize their liquor laws to allow freer interprovincial trade in wine, beer and spirits.
2018
Local & Regional Government, Trade & Technology, Regulation
At the 2006 Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) Convention, the Government of BC challenged local governments to develop a single business license framework, to become the first jurisdiction in Canada where businesses could operate freely anywhere in their province.
2018
Trade & Technology
Much of the recent energy dialogue has focused on the price of oil and the impact this is having on federal and provincial budgets. This misses the fact that a more fundamental shift is occurring in the global economy. For the first time in more than a century, multiple signs suggest that the dominance of fossil fuels is beginning to decline. We are seeing the beginning of a new technology revolution that will provide huge economic benefit for those able to place themselves at the forefront of this revolution.
2018
Finance & Taxation, Trade & Technology, Skills & Training
The BC TV/Film industry has three main revenue generating sectors: Live Action; Video Effects (VFX); and Digital Animation. BC leads the country in annual Film/TV production revenues ($2.6 billion).[1]
2018
Regulation, Healthy Communities
An increased number of improperly discarded needles are posing a risk to businesses, patrons of businesses and residents in certain areas.  The Chamber recommends amending service contracts with needle distributors to allow them to use professional judgement on how many needles to provide to each user.  
2018
Regulation, Healthy Communities
All British Columbians should have equitable access to medical services regardless of where in the province they live.  Access to quality healthcare is an important consideration for attracting and retaining qualified employees and often a key factor in the decision to relocate away from working and living in rural communities. In the 2017 report by the BC Forest Safety Ombudsman, Roger Harris, titled “Will It Be There?
2018
Regulation, Healthy Communities
Affordable accommodation for employees in resort communities is a significant barrier to growth and future success of resort communities. Many resort communities in British Colombia were started by the ability for developers to access land below market value to create the resort. 
2018
Transportation & Infrastructure, Trade & Technology
As highlighted in the 2016 report titled, The Economic Importance of the Lower Fraser River, the region under discussion stretches from Richmond to Hope, and is one of the prime economic generators in BC. As such, the Lower Fraser is a significant contributor to the national economy. Without clear strategic management between all levels of government and key stakeholders, the economic growth potential will not be fully realized. It is time to bring all vested interests together and chart a mutually agreed course forward that maximizes economic potential while managing risks.
2018
Healthy Communities
While much of the British Columbia Interior faces reduced available timber harvests due mainly to the effects of the mountain pine beetle epidemic, the Coast region continues to experience a persistent under-harvest of Allowable Annual Cut (AAC). The core issue behind this under-harvest is the poor economics of operating in mature Hemlock-Balsam (HemBal) stands, which make up a large portion of the Coastal Timber Harvesting Land Base.
2018
Finance & Taxation, Local & Regional Government, Healthy Communities
The primary source of funds to support the operations, maintenance and modernization of municipal infrastructure, amenities and services is a property tax system that pre-dates the digital, service-based economy of today.

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