Policies

The BC Chamber's grassroots policy-development process is second-to-none in British Columbia. Every year, our membership of businesses, Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade develops policies that reflect the on-the-ground needs of B.C. businesses. Through this process, our membership endorses approximately 40 new policies every year at our Annual General Meeting.

The breadth and diversity of our policies reflects our broad-based membership; during any given year, we have policy recommendations for the majority, if not all, of B.C.’s provincial government ministries.

BC Chamber's 2018-19 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual Tracker

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2017-18 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses  

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual

BC Chamber's 2016-17 Policy & Positions Manual - Government Responses               

                               

2016
Natural Resources
In order for Northern Gateway to get it right, they should be afforded the extra time needed to thoroughly complete conditions. The company needs to respond thoughtfully and fully to concerns, to develop the Project responsibly in the best interest of all stakeholders involved, and to consider the long-term health and success of our communities, environment and economy.  The project, deemed to be so beneficial to Canada, should be given reasonable preparation time to meet its conditions.
2016
Skills & Training, Regulation
Chamber members are citing challenges in hiring and housing qualified workers as a barrier to growth. In urban centres with high costs of living, like Vancouver, Toronto, and Victoria, it becomes particularly challenging to fill gaps at the mid- to lower-end of the employment spectrum, particularly for skilled, entry-level as well as low-skilled, difficult-to-fill positions. Businesses then turn to hiring foreign workers, but are often frustrated by a complex bureaucracy and lengthy timelines.
2016
Finance & Taxation
The Federal Excise Duty on alcohol is applied in an unbalanced manner that puts small distilleries at a distinct disadvantage both amongst wineries and breweries in Canada, which pay none or very little excise duty on the alcohol they produce, and amongst foreign distilleries that operate in lower cost/tax environments.
2016
Finance & Taxation, Regulation
Many of the businesses accepting credit card payments for goods and services are unclear on the inner workings of merchant services providers (MSPs). MSPs are a third party, such as VISA and MasterCard, who process credit card transactions. The current system has resulted in many businesses paying higher fees for credit card acceptance than necessary.
2016
Natural Resources
The natural gas reserves and the prospective potential resources in B.C. represent a very significant economic resource. Natural gas used to be exported east from B.C. and Alberta to markets in the north eastern U.S. and south from B.C. to western coast markets in the U.S. Increasingly, these markets are now being served by the abundant and inexpensive U.S. natural shale gas supplies.
2016
Transportation & Infrastructure, Trade & Technology
Port facilities throughout British Columbia are in need of expansion to facilitate a diversified number of commodities – many of which support the economic growth of Canada as a nation dependent upon international trade.
2016
Healthy Communities
There is clear evidence that availability of primary care has significant implications for British Columbia’s economy both in terms of overall population health and the impact of employee productivity and absences on business. Though our government has made expanding availability of primary care a key priority, British Columbia still suffers from a lack of primary care.
2016
Healthy Communities
Drug coverage in Canada is provided through an incomplete patchwork of private and public programs that varies across provinces. This fragmented system reduces access to medicines, diminishes drug purchasing power, duplicates administrative costs, and isolates pharmaceutical management from the management of medical and hospital care. It is needlessly costing Canadian businesses billions of dollars every year.
2016
Trade & Technology, Natural Resources
The forest industry is one of B.C.’s largest sectors that export into the United States and around the world. In 2013, B.C. forest industry revenue was $15.7 billion. Of this revenue, approximately 62 percent was generated in the interior region and 38 percent from the coast region making this an extremely important component of the B.C. economy.
2016
Natural Resources, Healthy Communities
The forest industry is one of B.C.’s most important economic sectors.  Forestry is a key economic driver; B.C. communities depend on the forest industry and thousands of people are employed in the various sectors of the industry. 

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